Monthly Archives: March 2018

Album Review: Interrobang (Self Titled)

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Hailing from a combination of both Brighton and Leeds, Interrobang consist of former Chumbawamba (of Tubthumbing fame) members, frontman Dunstan Bruce and drummer Harry Hamer. Joining forces to make a formidable trio with Stephen Griffin (ex-Regular Fries guitarist). Formed in 2012, the band have nurtured their current catalogue of music through a string of live performances. But now, they are set  to finally release their long-awaited 14-song-strong debut album. With lyrics littered with comic pop-culture references, heartfelt personal accounts and political commentary, it’s hard not to get invested in these short-lived masterpieces.

The album’s opener basically states the feelings of Bruce as plain as day; the spoken words resonate deeply with the listener, especially when he passionately states, “I’ve still got something to say, I don’t want to fade away.” Asking for A Friend is a kind of self-deprecating lament on feelings of turning 50, but rather than a mournful ballad, its humorous tone keeps the listener invested, as well as the storytelling skills which Bruce has mastered so eloquently on this record, which continue into protest anthems Are You Ready, People? and Mad as Hell.

As well as humour, tender moments are still predominantly featured, especially in Do You Remember, a sad tale focused on the loss of Bruce’s father, and him still trying to dissect their relationship. In addition, Based on A True Story finds the frontman considering his own mortality, stating that he’s “not scared to admit that he thinks of his own obituary.”

Hamer’s simple, punchy drum tracks keep the songs moving at a quick pace through the entirety of the album, and Griffin’s perfect, jangling Who-esque guitar tone strums the exact chords your ear wants to hear.

The offering ends with the wonderful, catchy Am I Invisible Yet? With a cheeky nod to The Who with the lyric, “more and more I’m talking about my generation.” A perfect conclusion to this rollercoaster ride of emotion.

Interrobang are offering themselves up as the voice of the lost era of punk, still ever-present in this fantastic 14-track smash, hopefully appealing to a new generation of kids who just want to say something, and ultimately make a difference in the world. 8/10

 

Catch interrobang?! on tour.

Check out their Facebook.

Visit their website.

Pre-order the album at: www.allthemadmen.co.uk

Album Review: Erasure – World Beyond

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Erasure are probably best known for their 80s heyday of flamboyant dance numbers, most notably their super-smash hit ‘A Little Respect’. But now, the synth pop duo, comprising of Andy Bell and Vince Clarke have taken their most recent album, 2017’s World Be Gone, and completely turned it on its head to release something completely experimental and different.

World Beyond sees the pair team up with Belgian post-classical musicians Echo Collective to give their usual 80s dance bops a new, eclectic edge which sounds eons apart from the original recordings of these tracks.

Harmonic strings and heartfelt delivery replaces their usual bravado-littered electro-pop sound. Nevertheless, Bell’s unmistakable vocals drag you back to the realisation that these are still Erasure’s original compositions.

The album’s lead single Still, It’s Not Over is a beautiful standout track on this offering; it could easily be the emotional crescendo of a west end musical and wouldn’t massively stand out from the rest of the soundtrack.

However, this unfortunately is also this album’s slight downfall – at times, it’s all a bit TOO dramatic. For those not particularly into the slow, ballad-esque lamenting style of music that comes across here, this will not be a pleasant listen. But, for those who can appreciate a classical reworking of an originally synth record, it will be a dream to the ears.

Some of the reworked tracks work better than others. The contributions of Echo Collective bring a new sparkle to before unnoticed gems. Songs like Be Careful What You Wish for and Love You to The Sky definitely benefit from the new emotive piano and strings melodies. Whereas A Bitter Parting becomes a little too akin to a jolly jamboree that could be sung on a trip out to sea.

Overall, in parts, World Beyond hits just the right sweet spot, and Erasure should be very proud that their decade spanning career still delivers, with new creativity for fans to enjoy. It’s clear that they’re still a hit, with their current tour sold out across every single date. Bell and Clarke should be so impressed with this most recent release. 6/10

 

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